Hello!

unnamed.png

Amy Harbourne

Texas A&M '20 

English BA

  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Instagram
My Academic and Professional Identity

I am a 2020 Texas A&M University alumni (2020) and a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University (2022).

      I approach my work with enthusiasm and curiosity. My passion goes beyond enjoying the learning experience. I am dedicated to translating my academic experiences and tenacity to actionable goals that have the capacity to benefit systemically disenfranchised communities.

     

     Currently, my research focuses on a rhetorical analysis of conversations in and out of medical examination rooms. This research involves methodologies such as conversation and discourse analysis, ethnographic data collection. I place special emphasis on including feminist and anti-racist understandings of how the experiences of patients in examination rooms is affected by the sociocultural history and institutional practices of medicine.  I am currently searching for a doctoral program that shares my dedication to improving the patient experience. 

About Me

         I'm from Brownsville, Texas, a small town on the Mexican-American border. I have five cats and my husband is a professor of psychology. My interest in the Rhetoric of Medicine comes from my personal experiences in and out of clinics and hospitals throughout my childhood and present. My time at Texas A&M led me to the fascinating narratives and research opportunities in Rhetoric. At Carnegie Mellon University I was equipped with the tools and expertise of methodology and foundations of research.

My favorite Books 

  • Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America by Ijeoma Oluo

  • The Librarian of Auschwitz
    by Antonio G. Iturbe, Lilit Thwaites (Translation)

  • The Well of Lonliness by Radclyffe Hall

  • Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language by Amanda Montell

DSC_0850.NEF.jpg

Land Acknowledgement 

At this time, I am occupying the ancestral lands of the Haudenosaunee, Lenape, Monongahela, Osage, and Shawnee peoples. I thank them for the care, health, and existence of this land. It is because of them that what is called Pittsburgh has existed throughout time.